• M. Barsotts

How's Your Year of Mindfulness, So Far?

It's beginning of February, and perhaps there's the thought in your mind about how it takes on average 66 days to create a new habit. Hmmm...we're 36 days into the new year. Have you checked in with yourself? I get it, change is scary even if we don't want to admit it, change is uncomfortable. But the definition of insanity is staying the same. Are we just driving ourselves crazy? And our we driving ourselves crazy by just setting a resolution in the first place? Do you set the SAME resolution EVERY year (please see the definition of insanity, above) ?


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Here's a suggestion, throw the notion of 66 days to become a habit in the compost bin. It's time to see it change into something else. The something else is called mindfulness. And unless you've been under a rock for the past 5 years, you've probably heard of it. But have you really given it a try? Based on my interaction with humans on a daily basis, my guess is folks truly are not giving mindfulness a try. There's a lot of anxiety, regret, unrealistic goal setting being discussed in my environment, and as someone who absorbs energy easily this can get to me.

How can mindfulness help? How does this relate to digestion? How can I begin to implement it immediately and become the best I can at mindfulness, and make the other moms jealous in Mommy and Me yoga? .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

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I can see I lost you, there. Let's reign it back in and start over.

Mindfulness: a mental state achieved by focusing one's awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one's feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations, used as a therapeutic technique.

"Accepting one's feelings." I find this to be a tricky one, and a phrase that made more sense after reading the book, "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F#$%", by Mark Manson. This book is not about becoming an indifferent person who checks out for the sake of protecting themselves, but quite the opposite. It's about letting go of the constant race to be the most positive with the shiniest of all the lifestyles, with all the things. And most importantly, when you're having a bad day and not feeling up to those social media posts about how you should be feeling your best self, ALWAYS; FEEL that. FEEL like crap, have a crappy day, and know that's ok. Accept what you're feeling, when you're feeling it, and OWN it.

Now bear with me, this might sound ludicrous, but what if you dialed back on social media? All the Twitters? When I mention this to individuals, the responses typically range from, "How else would I know what my sister is doing on a daily basis?" "I need to get rid of all my extra things I don't want anymore on Buy Sell Trade." "I need to like my friend's page; they just started a selling nail polish to save the sea turtles fundraiser."

Ok. Pause. If you don't know what your sister is doing unless checking FB, perhaps the relationship needs some work, or more specifically, you could text her. If you have so many things, perhaps that is an underlying issue that needs to be addressed. As far as the nail polish to save the sea turtles; ok, they're REALLY cute. I get it, I suggested to dial back.

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What I was suggesting, was perhaps not having the social media apps on your phone, which is always on your person, and checking in once a day instead of every single time you look down.

Social media tends to be toxic to those of us who tends towards anxiety, nervousness, and depression. Perhaps decide to only use one line of social media to promote your own side hustle, such as LinkedIn, which is not as personal, and F.O.M.O. inducing.

A new study shows evidence there is in fact a causal link between using the socials and negative effects on well-being, primarily depression and loneliness. The study was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

More to the point, the socials take you OUT of the present moment. And that's the point of this post. Being mindful of where your are, how you feel, and simply being.

A wonderful book that comes to mind, that poses the thought; if I use the socials less, and move MORE; can I be happier?

Check out author Kelly McGonigal, psychologist, and Stanford lecturer. She has a new book "The Joy of Movement", in which she goes into the science and benefits of movement, helping us to understand why people who are physically active are happier and more satisfied with their lives, have a stronger sense of purpose, experience more gratitude, love and hope, feel more connected to their communities, are less likely to become depressed, and so much more. Feeling more connected to our communities is an act of karma (path of service) which is one of the overlapping branches of yoga.


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Moving forward into the year, don't get down on yourself and feel as if you didn't accomplish your resolution. Bin the idea and move onto the present moment your in, and know YOU. ARE. ENOUGH!

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R.D., L.D., R.Y.T., 

Ayurvedic Health Educator

© 2017 by Marisa Barsotti. Proudly created with Wix.com

 

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